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Arts & Labor 2-Day Strategy Discussions

[From OWS Artsandlabor.org]

Do you need two or three jobs to make ends meet? Do you run from one workplace to another, or juggle a series of temporary “gigs” throughout the year? Are you overworked? Is your boss also your peer? Are you owed money from an employer? Do you feel unsafe, abused and dispensable at your job? Do you feel like if you stand up for yourself, the future of your career is at risk? Are you worried about getting sick because you don’t have good health insurance or that you will never be able to retire? And if you do have a stable job, are the benefits dwindling? Do you want to make change but don’t how?

Arts & Labor presents a two-part discussion series, bringing together workers, community organizers and culture producers to discuss how precarious conditions are impacting our culture at large. Moderated by Tammy Kim with an introduction by Arts & Labor, we will learn how worker centers, arts organizations, coalition groups, and independent workers are developing strategies to build community and labor power, more equitable work environments, and a just and habitable city for all people.

DAY 1: Workers Unite!
Monday, January 7, 2013. 7 p.m.
P!
334 Broome St, Manhattan

Day 1 Facebook Invite: http://www.facebook.com/events/557881620908504/

Members of worker centers, unions, and coalition organizations share how to create infrastructure and build leverage within industries and communities that are traditionally considered difficult to organize. With workers from Domestic Workers United, Taxi Workers Alliance, Teamsters Local 814 (Art Handlers from Sotheby’s campaign), Alliance for a Greater New York (ALIGN).

 

DAY 2: Strategies for the Arts
Thursday, January 10, 2013. 7 p.m.
CUNY Murphy Institute
18th Floor, 25 W 43 St, Manhattan

Day two Facebook invite: Strategies in the Arts here: http://www.facebook.com/events/401369849943937/

Members of the arts community respond to the Day 1 discussion, and talk about strategies used to build community, advocate for artists and create sustainable institutions. They will also examine the challenges and strengths in navigating their roles as activists, precarious workers, job providers, and culture producers. With workers from Queens Museum, Creative Capital, ProjectProjects, and WAGE.

The Legacy of the Puerto Rican Art Workers Coalition

Via OWS Arts & Labor
The Legacy of the Puerto Rican Art Workers Coalition: A Talk with Yasmin Ramirez

December 12, 2012 at 7PM
Taller Boricua
1680 Lexington Ave
New York City

In the late 1960s, art workers in New York City came together to demand reforms to the exploitive and exclusionary practices of the art world. The Puerto Rican Art Workers Coalition (PRAWC), founded in 1970, followed the 1969 formation of the Art Workers Coalition (AWC), a group aimed at pressuring city museums into implementing policies such as paying artists for exhibiting their work, better representation of art by women and people of color, and free admission. Members of PRAWC were active in founding El Museo del Barrio (1969), and fought to establish institutions that reflected the culture and needs of Latino artists in New York City. Join Arts & Labor for a presentation by Yasmin Ramirez about the history and legacy of the Puerto Rican Art Workers Coalition. Founding member of the PRAWC Marcos Dimas will also be present to participate in the discussion.

Yasmin Ramirez Biography
Yasmin Ramirez Ph.D. is an art historian and independent curator.  Growing up during  heyday of the Alternative Art Space Movement in New York, Yasmin Ramirez has worked at Taller Boricua, El Museo Del Barrio, The Studio Museum, The New Museum, Art in General, and Alternative Museum, Franklin Furnance and the East Village Eye. She is currently writing a book based on her dissertation: Nuyorican Vanguards: The Puerto Rican Art Movement in New York.

Tonight Time Sq 8pm!: (Dont Be) A Puppet Show!

OWS Puppets- 2012 ElectionsThe People’s Puppets have been feverishly working on a puppet of the winner of the election: Monopoly Man. He happens to be 12 feet tall (without his fancy top hat) and happens to have two puppet pets to guide along his stroll through New York City… Obama and Romney, of course!

Please join us on Election Day.
Tuesday, November 6th, 2012
at the steps in Time Sq.

What we need is volunteers to be with us, be festive, be informative (we will have “Get out of Jail Free” cards with information to hand out), we need live streamers and photographers! and EVEN take your opportunity to man some of our puppets!

We all know, and have been working on Occupy Sandy Relief efforts… But if we miss the opportunity to address the sham of the election, we miss a beautiful boat.

We think all Occupy Sandy relief efforts must continue, and request people to come and support the election action to make this work…because it’s about solidarity, and spreading out our efforts. After the election, since everything will still be the same old, that we can return to the Hurricane relief, Occupying Goldman Sachs, Occupying Trinity, Golden Farms, Occupying the Pipeline, Rent Strike, Debt Strike, Occupy for Animals and the hundreds of other things that must be occupied in order to bring our world to a place of dignity…

If you can, come out and SPEAK OUT against the indignity that is the American Election and encourage THE PEOPLE to take action in our democracy after the Election Day.

With love,
The People’s Puppets of Occupy Wall Street

FACEBOOK INVITE: Election Day “(Don’t be) A Puppet Show” *all invited*

Tonight 7pm: Arts & Labor Art Writing Roundtable

[via OWS Arts & Labor]

Art Writing as Craft, Labor, and Art: An Arts & Labor Roundtable
Thursday October 25 at 7 p.m.
Housing Works Cafe and Bookstore
126 Crosby Street New York, NY
Admission: a book donation to Housing Works Bookstore Cafe

Art writing is hard work. However, it is often framed as a mythic activity, replete with benefits such as “the power of the pen,” the authority of the critic, and the allure of earning a living while doing something exciting, and meaningful.

The realities of writing about contemporary art include a precarious living, high attrition, hard deadlines, and the charge that criticism is “massively produced, and massively ignored.” Rather than being treated as an art form or a skill developed over time, art writing is frequently viewed as a tool of the market and an index for valuation and canonization, with art writers functioning as cogs in the vast cultural machine.

So why do people continue to write about art? Why does one aspire to become an art writer in a field that has shrinking prestige and financial returns, and when chief-critic positions are becoming scarce? And why, in this economic climate, is art writing thriving online and degree-programs devoted to the field have begun to appear?

Join Arts & Labor for a roundtable to discuss labor conditions in art writing. Hear how various writers’ practices began, how their careers evolved, and what they think about the current state of art writing. Together we will attempt to imagine how writers could develop new networks to support one another, and to practice their art and craft in a sustainable and generative way in the future.

Art writers include: Ben Davis, Kareem Estefan, Ken Johnson, Paddy Johnson, Omar Lopez-Chahoud, Walter Robinson, Mira Schor, Martha Schwendener, and Christian Viveros-Fauné.

Networks of Resistance Meet-Up – Sun Oct 28 @3pm

Building Networks of Resistance

Sunday October 28th, 3-6pm. Momenta Art, 56 Bogart in Bushwick.

Calling artists interested in alternatives to the current system!

If you are interested in organizing in your community or already doing so, let’s meet-up and talk.

3pm Pre-Event Meet-Up:
Building Networks of Resistance

4-6pm Event:
Alternatives & the Commons*

Momenta Art
56 Bogart Street
Brooklyn, NY 11206

L train to Morgan

Download Flyer: ArtCommons-MomentaOct28.jpg

 

*A commons is a resource that is organized and shared by individuals. Art & The Commons is part of coalition of individuals and affinity groups that are investigating ways in which art, culture, and art education can be understood and developed as a commons. Commoning also serves as a guard against private enclosures. more info: artandthecommons.org

Twice the Work, Half the Pay: Entrepreneurship and Exploitation in the Music Industry

[This Thursday. Via Arts & Labor, OWS Arts Network Group, posted on October 4, 2012 ]

1942 Recording BanThursday, Oct. 18, 6-8pm
Judson Memorial Church, Assembly Hall (239 Thompson St., New York)
Facebook invite:  http://www.facebook.com/events/286009974832420

The annual CMJ Music Marathon comes to NYC October 16-20, with panels on the music business promising to “help make sense of the current climate.” But what does it really offer musicians? How does the industry itself, which promotes ideas such as the “super-entrepreneur,” contribute to the difficult conditions musicians face?

Musicians regularly surmount these myriad problems: working for tips, below minimum wage or nothing; misclassification/1099s; inconsistent gigs; multiple employers; a lack of respect for their profession; and a byzantine system of agents, contractors, media and tech companies climbing over each to profit from musicians’ work.

Individually, we make it work because we have to. We have to survive, we have to make a living, we have to perform. The industry leads us to believe that there is no other way to do so. And while so much of our career is social (performing and networking), we are on our own when it comes to the business side. This hardly allows us to see the big picture. Who’s making the money? Why should musicians take on so much of the risk, but little of the reward?

These issues are not unique to the music industry. Many people in professions deemed “entrepreneurial” or “independent” experience similar conditions, including visual artists, taxi drivers, childcare workers, truckers, freelancers, construction workers, domestic workers, writers, and others. How are they addressing these problems?

Join musicians and other workers for a facilitated discussion and strategy session to explore ways we can act together against the systems that keep us isolated and divided.


A collaboration between OWS Arts & Labor99 Pickets, and the Musicians Solidarity Council.

Image above: The 1942 Recording Ban and the ASCAP/BMI War